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Upcoming Events

Contested Identities and Statelessness: Exploring “Belongingness” in the Case of Immigrants in Kenya and the U.S.

Oct 23, 2019
12:00 pm
Rm. 101 International Studies Bldg, 910 S. Fifth St., C

This talk explores politics of belonging and its implications for immigrant communities in Kenya and the U.S. The speaker looks at construction of boundaries--both real and conceptual--that lead to the construction of “us” vs. “them,” the criteria for immigrants’ admission into a nation’s citizenship, and the simultaneous processes of their inclusion in and exclusion from national citizenship. She draws parallels in the processes, structures, and discourses of marginalization and securitization of immigrants in Kenya and the U.S. She argues that even though these processes, structures, and discourses may vary in form, they are not exclusive to either country.

August Wilson's "Gem of the Ocean"

Oct 24, 2019 to Oct 27, 2019
8:30 am
Cowell Playhouse

Chuck Smith, guest director. Choreography by Kemal Nance and Endalyn Taylor In 1904 Pittsburgh, formerly enslaved woman Aunt Ester holds the African American community together. Aunt Ester is a soul washer, restoring the spiritual balance of troubled individuals. Her powers and community are tested when newcomer Citizen Barlow refuses to accept responsibility for his actions. Part of August Wilson’s celebrated Pittsburgh Cycle, Illinois Theatre’s production is directed by long-time Wilson collaborator Chuck Smith and features a newly choreographed and composed City of Bones section in collaboration with Dance at Illinois. Part of the 1619 & Beyond Series, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois.

Panel Discussion: "Why 1619 Matters"

Oct 24, 2019
12:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Everitt Lab, Room 2310

Moderated by Dr. Erik McDuffie. Part of the 1619 & Beyond Series, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois.

Torkwase Dyson, 1919: Black Water On Painting, Climate Change, and the History of Environmental Segregation

Oct 24, 2019
5:30 pm to 6:30 pm
Plym Auditorium, Temple Hoyn Buell Hall, 611 E. Lorado Taft Drive

Torkwase Dyson uses painting and drawing to investigate spatial relationships, particularly as experienced by black and brown bodies as they navigate space. Dyson will discuss recent bodies of work, including 1919: Black Water, currently on view at the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery at Columbia University. This exhibition responds to the 100th anniversary of the “Red Summer” of 1919, focusing on a tragic episode in the segregated waters of Chicago’s beaches. Additionally, she'll engage with campus participants in a workshop addressing shared interests in the politics and problems of space and movement within the social and cultural environments we inhabit.

Art Talk Thursday | Maureen Warren

Oct 24, 2019
5:30 pm
Krannert Art Museum | 500 E Peabody Dr.

This month’s event will feature Maureen Warren, Curator of European and American Art, and will highlight the re-installation of the Bow and Trees Galleries. Reception to follow.

Environmental Humanities Film Screening and Talk | Gregg Mitman

Oct 24, 2019
7:00 pm
Room 208, Second Floor, Levis Faculty Center (919 W. Illinois St., Urbana)

Film screening and discussion of The Land Beneath Our Feet with Gregg Mitman. The Land Beneath Our Feet follows a young Liberian man, uprooted by war, who returns from the USA with never-before-seen footage of Liberia’s past. The uncovered footage is embraced as a national treasure. Depicting a 1926 corporate land grab, it is also an explosive reminder of eroding land rights. In post-conflict Liberia, individuals and communities are pitted against multinational corporations, the government, and each other in life-threatening disputes over land. What can this ghostly footage offer a nation, as it debates radical land reforms that could empower communities to shape a more diverse, stable and sustainable future? Dr. Mitman is Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

The Second Book Project Symposium

Oct 25, 2019
9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Lucy Ellis Lounge, 1080 Foreign Language Building

This event brings together scholars, mostly in American literatures, to talk about their "second book projects," books that they're in the midst of writing. This fall, we have projects on environmental humanities, race and print culture, Latinx modernism, and medical humanities. Rather than close readings drawn from a chapter, speakers give preliminary versions of their book introductions, about 30 minutes each. It's more a public workshop than symposium, and their short statements are followed by a spirited discussion. This event should especially interest faculty at similar stages in their own work and graduate students curious about developing post-dissertation projects.

Registration Deadline: Humanities Career Discovery Group for Graduate Students

Oct 25, 2019
5:00 pm

Join a collaborative group that will help you figure out what matters to you and offer support as you explore new paths. Open to grad students in any field whose work involves humanistic inquiry. Each session will include a conversation with someone with a humanities degree doing interesting work, and one session will feature a site visit to the University of Illinois Press. Please register by October 25, 5 p.m. The group will meet October 29 through December 3. Learn more and register at https://go.grad.illinois.edu/HumanitiesCareers

Curious and Eclectic Seminar Series

Oct 29, 2019
12:00 pm
Beckman 1005

Esther Ngumbi, assistant professor of Entomology. Interests include chemical signaling between plants, insects, herbivores, and microorganisms

Indigenous Studies | Modern Critical Theory Lecture Series

Oct 29, 2019
5:15 pm to 6:45 pm
Lincoln Hall 1090

Readings and details at criticism.english.illinois.edu.

Illinois History and Lincoln Collections Open House

Oct 30, 2019
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Room 324 of the University of Illinois Main Library

Join us at the Illinois History and Lincoln Collections to learn more about our diverse collections of books and manuscript materials, artifacts and ephemera, and more! Explore treasures from our collections on display in our reading room, view our exhibit on the rich history of the railroad in Illinois before it closes, and enjoy light refreshments. This event is free and open to the public; all are welcome. To request disability-related accommodations for this event or for more information, please contact the Illinois History and Lincoln Collections at 217-333-1777 or ihlc@library.illinois.edu.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Faculty Forum | The 1619 & Beyond Series

Oct 30, 2019
5:00 pm to 7:30 pm
Third Floor Lecture Hall, Levis Faculty Center (919 West Illinois Street, Urbana)

Featuring Dr. Dana Williams (Howard University), Dr. Ronald Bailey (African American Studies), Dr. Chistopher Span (Education). Dr. Candice Jenkins (English & African American Studies), moderator. Part of the 1619 & Beyond Series, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Department of African American Studies at the University of Illinois.

Building Vibrant Movement Organizations for the Long Haul

Oct 31, 2019
11:00 am to 1:00 pm
Center for Advanced Study, Levis Faculty Center, Room 210

FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Movements are made of relationships to resist domination and support survival. Being in organizations can be difficult, and many struggle with conflict. Many people burn out. Yet, we can’t build resistance without working together. This workshop examines how organizations cultivate internal cultures to support transparency, democracy, and accountability. We will look at how norms we learn from dominant culture can produce harmful organizational cultures and explore methods that make our organizations more powerful, sustainable, and pleasurable. We'll examine what we need to grow and support collectivities to produce new ways of working for liberation.

Medical Humanities Lecture | Londa Schiebinger

Oct 31, 2019
4:00 pm
IPRH Lecture Hall, Levis Faculty Center, Fourth Floor (919 West Illinois Street, Urbana) 

Londa Schiebinger is Professor of History of Science, Director, Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering and Environment Project, Stanford University.

Public Opening Reception | A+D Faculty Exhibition

Oct 31, 2019
5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Krannert Art Museum | 500 E Peabody Dr.

Celebrate Opening Night of the School of Art + Design Faculty Exhibition.

PJCS Workshop, Leora Batnitzky, “Between Religion and Politics: Recent Conversion Controversies in Israel and India”

Nov 04, 2019
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
608 S Wright St., Urbana Room 109A English

Professor Batnitzky will present work from her current, book-length project on comparative conversion controversies in Israel and India. The paper will be circulated in advance. Participants are encouraged to read and come prepared to discuss the discuss, but everyone is welcome to attend.

Goldberg Lecture: Leora Batnitzky (Princeton Univ.), “Race and Grace: Rethinking Paul and its Implications for Modern Jewish Thought and Christian Theology”

Nov 04, 2019
5:30 pm to 6:45 pm
Lucy Ellis Lounge, 1080 Foreign Languages Building

Leora F. Batnitzky is the Ronald O. Perelman Professor of Jewish Studies at Professor of Religion at Princeton University. Her teaching and research interests include philosophy of religion, modern Jewish thought, hermeneutics, and contemporary legal and political theory. In 2002 she received Princeton’s President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching. She is the author of Idolatry and Representation: The Philosophy of Franz Rosenzweig Reconsidered (Princeton, 2000), Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas: Philosophy and the Politics of Revelation (Cambridge, 2006), and How Judaism Became a Religion: An Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought (Princeton, 2011).

Feminist Theory | Modern Critical Theory Lecture Series

Nov 05, 2019
5:15 pm to 6:45 pm
Lincoln Hall 1090

Readings and details at criticism.english.illinois.edu.

TIGER/The Unreliable Bestiary - Performance by Deke Weaver

Nov 07, 2019
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Krannert Art Museum, Lower Level Auditorium (Room 62)

TIGER is the 5th performance from Deke Weaver’s life-long Unreliable Bestiary project: a performance for each letter of the alphabet, each letter represented by an endangered animal or habitat. Built for small theaters, living rooms, and barns, TIGER is more intimate than sprawling older brothers MONKEY, ELEPHANT, WOLF, and BEAR. Part Spalding Gray, part Laurie Anderson, TIGER might feel like a travelogue, a séance, a Parisian salon: dark thoughtful humor for the anthropocene. Written, performed, and codirected by Deke Weaver, TIGER’s award-winning collaborators include codirector/dramaturg Jayne Wenger, costume designer Susan Becker, sound designer Jacob Ross, and visual artist Melissa Pokorny.

Performance: Reconstruction of a Ohad Naharin masterwork by Visitiong Lecturer/Choreographer Omri Drumlevich

Nov 07, 2019 to Nov 09, 2019
7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts

Israeli artist Omri Drumlevich will reconstruct a masterwork by Ohad Naharin, one of the most influential choreographers of our time and artistic director of Batsheva Dance Company. Noted for his intense, visceral, and poetic approaches to choreography, Naharin has been a key figure in the contemporary and experimental field of choreography. Part of November Dance 2019. Tickets available through the Krannert Center box office. Purchase Tickets.

Let's Have a Kiki: Lola Carter Rothschild

Nov 12, 2019
12:30 pm to 1:00 pm
Spurlock Museum, 600 S Gregory St, Urbana

“Let’s Have a Kiki” is a series of half hour informal gallery talks during the run of the exhibit In Her Closet—How to Make a Drag Queen. Exhibit participants talk about their drag practice and exhibit-related themes, concepts, and materials.

Queer Theory | Modern Critical Theory Lecture Series

Nov 12, 2019
5:15 pm to 6:45 pm
Lincoln Hall 1090

Readings and details at criticism.english.illinois.edu.

Rosenthal Lecture: The Secret of Solidarity. Helping Jews in the Holocaust - Mark Roseman (Indiana University)

Nov 13, 2019
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Lucy Ellis Lounge, 1080 Foreign Languages Building (707 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801)

Mark Roseman is a Professor of History and the Pat M Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies at Indiana University. He is a historian of modern Europe, with particular interests in the History of the Holocaust and in modern German history. His publications have covered a wide range of topics in German, European and Jewish history, including life-reform and protest in 1920s and 1930s Germany; Holocaust survival and memory; Nazi policy and perpetrators; the social impact of total war; post-1945 German and European reconstruction; generation conflict and youth rebellion; Jewish and other minorities in modern German history.  

Anti-Semitism Today: A Critical Dialogue

Nov 14, 2019
4:00 pm
IPRH Lecture Hall, Levis Faculty Center, Fourth Floor (919 West Illinois Street, Urbana)

with Peter Fritzsche (History), and Mark Roseman (History, Indiana University Bloomington. Moderated by Harriet Murav (Slavic Languages & Literatures and Comparative & World Literature). Co-sponsored by Jewish Culture & Society.

Art Talk Thursday | Lilah Leopold

Nov 14, 2019
5:30 pm
Krannert Art Museum | 500 E Peabody Dr.

This month’s event will feature Lilah Leopold, curatorial intern and PhD student in Art History, and will highlight “Hot Spots: Radioactivity and the Landscape.” Reception to follow.

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