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Upcoming Events

AACC/CEAPS Food for Thought: Kofi: Boxing and Manga in Japan

Sep 28, 2021
11:45 am to 12:30 pm
1210 W. Nevada Street Urbana, IL 61801, Asian American Cultural Center

Kofi Bazzell-Smith is an artist, professional boxer, and MFA candidate in the New Media program at the University of Illinois. His area is Japanese manga, which he produces in both English and Japanese. Kofi has both boxed and studied manga with professionals in Japan and gives talks and workshops on manga, language, and international engagement. A recipient of the 2021 Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowship(FLAS), Kofi’s goal is to promote engagement through art and language on campus.

Lemann Lecture Series: Rosana Pinheiro Machado

Sep 28, 2021
2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Campus Instructional Facility, Room 2039 or on Zoom

Brands, Boots, and Bolsonaro: The political consequences of "inclusion through consumption" in Brazil (2009-2021)   Rosana Pinheiro Machado is an anthropologist and a social scientist focusing on economic and political transformations in emerging economies. She has been conducting fieldwork and developing international research collaborations across the global south, especially Brazil and China. Her research deals with the topics of globalization, development, and poverty. A thread running through her research agenda is the desire to gain a longitudinal, local understanding of the major processes of world-making and world-ordering that have transformed emerging countries in economic and political terms.

Legal Humanities: Samuel Moyn – “The Coming of Humane War”

Sep 28, 2021
7:30 pm

Join us for a discussion of Samuel Moyn's new book Humane followed by commentary from respondents  Nicholas Grossman (Political Science) and Patrick Keenan (Law).   ABOUT THE SPEAKER  Samuel Moyn is Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History at Yale University. He has written several books in the fields of European intellectual history and human rights history. His newest book, Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War, appears with Farrar, Straus, and Giroux in fall 2021.    ABOUT THE BOOK In Humane, Moyn asks a troubling but urgent question: What if efforts to make war more ethical—to ban torture and limit civilian casualties—have only shored up the military enterprise and made it sturdier? To advance this case, Moyn looks back at a century and a half of passionate arguments about the ethics of using force.   Cosponsors include: Illinois Global Institute Transitional Justice Initiative, College of Law, Department of History, Department of Philosophy, Department of Political Science, Department of Religion, Illinois Program in Law and Philosophy, Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Center for Global Studies, Russian, East European and Eurasian Center, Women and Gender in Global Perspectives.

Research Cluster Event: Just Infrastructures presents Fernanda Viegas + Martin Wattenberg

Sep 29, 2021
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg are computer scientists whose work in machine learning focuses on transparency and interpretability, as part of a broad agenda to improve human/AI interaction. They are also well-known for their contributions to social and collaborative data visualization. They will present on Wednesday, September 29, 2021. The event will take place on Zoom from 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. Central time. Register and learn more at just-infras.illinois.edu.

Mariselle Meléndez: Reading Colonial Latin America through Primary Sources in the Rare Book & Manuscript Library

Sep 29, 2021
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm

The Rare Book & Manuscript Library is pleased to welcome Mariselle Meléndez, LAS Alumni Distinguished Professorial Scholar and Professor of Spanish at the U of I, to showcase some of the unique holdings in our collection. In her live Zoom presentation at 3:00pm on Wednesday, September 29, Professor Meléndez will discuss what these primary sources can tell us about the interactions between Europe and the Americas between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries. Open to any and all interested, please join us by registering at the following link: https://illinois.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_C4wYH7bRQqO2bEJwhHnLJg

Research Cluster Event: Krystiana Krupa - "Cultural and Biological Relationships Between Human and Non-Human Beings"

Sep 30, 2021
3:30 pm

A multitude of academic disciplines explore the complex networks of relationships between humans and other beings. Through the lens of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), I describe human/non-human relationships as they are represented in museums and other repositories. I introduce museum “collections” and “objects,” including animals, instead as beings which may have roles, responsibilities, and agency in their relationships with living humans. Participants are invited to consider the changing relationships between human and non-human beings through time, and to reflect on how we identify non-human “beings” and our responsibilities to them in our work and lives.

REEEC New Directions Lecture: Amanda Gregg, "Beyond 'Backwardness': New Research on Firms in Imperial Russia"

Sep 30, 2021
4:00 pm

Firms in Imperial Russia faced institutional barriers to firm formation and a relatively small financial sector, yet Russian industry grew rapidly around the turn of the twentieth century. This talk presents results from several studies using newly collected firm-level and corporation-level data from the Russian Empire that reconcile the dynamism of the Russian industrial economy with remaining obstacles, thus permitting a more nuanced assessment of economic development under the Tsars.

Medical Humanities Lecture: “Teaching Health Humanities Differently: The Health Humanities Portrait Approach”

Sep 30, 2021
4:00 pm

This talk, presented by Sandy Sufian (University of Illinois Chicago), presents a unique, humanities-driven approach to structural competency that addresses the socio-political aspects of health and healthcare. The Health Humanities Portrait (HHP) presents six key elements—texture, tonality, perspective-taking, centering the subject, critical composition, and juxtaposition—that draw from the insights of arts, photography, and literature in order to forward an understanding of pressing social themes that are shaped by, and shape, experiences of health and illness. When combined, these tenets foster proficiency in what Sufian and her colleagues call “critical portraiture,” a process that enables learners to analyze the depth and breadth of the human and social dimensions of patients’ lives so they can appreciate the simultaneous and multiple, social and institutional realities many patients face. For registration information, please contact Professor Stephanie Hilger.

A+D Visitor Series: Jill H. Casid

Sep 30, 2021
5:00 pm

Join us for this Scholar Lecture with Jill H. Casid, Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Art History at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. How might we live our dying on a dying planet in a way that contests its terms? Drawing on work from her almost-completed book project Necrolandscaping, Casid offers an aesthetic tactics of landscape in the deformative, in which the volatile, strangely resilient powers of the negative are mined as vital resources for a Necrocene ethics.

Reimagining Art Futures for Recovery

Sep 30, 2021
5:30 pm to 6:30 pm
Temple Buell Hall Plym Auditorium , with reception to follow in Blicharski Atrium

Please join the College of FAA Arts Impact Initiative for a much-needed dialogue about the challenges and opportunities facing creative communities as they reemerge and reimagine equitable futures for art, artists and their communities in recovery from COVID-19 and systemic racism. Free and open to the public. Both in-person and online. Registration welcome: https://go.illinois.edu/ArtFutures.

WGGP Speaker/IGI Blueprint for Transitional Justice in the US Series- Dr. Fionnuala Ní Aoláin "The Relevance of Transitional Justice Twenty Years after 9/11"

Sep 30, 2021
7:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This lecture will address the challenges and relevance of transitional justice twenty years after the events of 9/11 and in the context of the return of the Taliban to territorial control of Afghanistan.  Lessons learned over the past twenty years, and in particular the relevance of accountability, truth, justice, and reparations to the 'war on terror' will be examined. Professor Fionnuala Ní Aoláin is concurrently Regents Professor and Robina Professor of Law, Public Policy and Society at the University of Minnesota Law School and Professor of Law at the Queens University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.  She has published extensively in the fields of emergency powers, counter-terrorism and human rights, conflict regulation, transitional justice and sex based violence in times of war. Professor Ní Aoláin is currently the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Protection and Promotion of Human Rights while Countering Terrorism (2017-), and was re-elected for a second term in August 2020. This event is part of The 2021-2022 Blueprint for Transitional Justice in the US: Building on Lessons and Insights from Global Perspectives Series presented by the Illinois Global Institute in partnership with Center for African Studies, Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, Center for Global Studies, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, European Union Center, Lemann Center for Brazilian Studies, and Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program. This series is made possible by the Chancellor’s 2021-2022 Call to Action to Address Racism & Social Injustice Research Program and co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, and the Humanities Research Institute.  Additional support is provided by the Department of Education Title VI Program.

"Properties of Free Music": Presented by Joe Morris

Oct 06, 2021
4:00 pm
Spurlock Museum

HRI is pleased to co-sponsor a series of programs on music improvisation featuring New England-based guitarist Joe Morris, widely recognized as one of the most original and important improvising artists of our time. Morris will offer a lecture and performance on Wednesday, October 6, and a workshop on Friday, October 8, 2021.   Morris begins his short residency at Illinois with a lecture at the Spurlock Museum drawing from and expanding on his 2012 book “Perpetual Frontier: The Properties of Free Music,” a concise volume on music improvisation developed (at the time) from nearly four decades of experience as a student, performer, curator, and educator in the field. “Perpetual Frontier” reflects Morris’ deep investigation into the methodologies of the field and encourages a practice that continually invites new possibilities.   About Joe Morris Downbeat Magazine called guitarist/multi-instrumentalist/composer/improviser Joe Morris “the preeminent free music guitarist of his generation.” Will Montgomery, writing in WIRE magazine, called him “one of the most profound improvisers at work in the U.S.”   He was born in New Haven, Connecticut in 1955. He began playing guitar at the age of 14 first playing rock music, progressing to blues, then to jazz, free jazz and free improvisation. He released his first record Wraparound (riti) in 1983. He has composed over 200 original pieces of music.   Morris has performed and/or recorded with many of the most important contemporary artists in improvised music including, Anthony Braxton, Evan Parker, John Zorn, Ken Vandermark, Mary Halvorson, Tyshawn Sorey, Tomeka Reid, Fay Victor, Tim Berne, Jaimie Branch, William Parker, Sylvie Courvoisier, Agusti Fernandez, Peter Evans, David S. Ware, Joe Maneri, Dewey Redman, Sunny Murray, Wadada Leo Smith, Leroy Jenkins, Ikue Mori, Charmaine Lee, Lawrence D. “Butch” Morris, Marshall Allen, Barre Phillips, Barry Guy, Matthew Shipp, Sunny Murray, Zeena Parkins, Joe McPhee and many others.   Morris is featured as leader, co-leader, or sideman on more than 180 commercially released recordings on the labels ECM, ESPdisk, Clean Feed, Hat Hut, Aum Fidelity, Avant, OkkaDisk, Not Two, Soul Note, Leo, No Business, Rogue Art, Relative Pitch, Incus, RareNoise, Fundacja Sluchaj, and his own labels Riti and Glacial Erratic. Morris has toured extensively throughout North America and Europe as well as in Brazil , Korea and Japan.   He has lectured and conducted workshops on his own music and on improvisation in the US, Canada, and Europe including at Princeton University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Bard College, University of Alberta, and University of Guelph. He was the recipient of the 2016 Killam Visiting Scholar Award at University of Calgary. He has been on the faculty at Tufts University, Southern Connecticut State University, Longy School of Music of Bard College, and New School. Since 2000, he has been on the faculty in the Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation Department at New England Conservatory. Morris is the author of the book Perpetual Frontier: The Properties of Free Music (Riti Publishing 2012).   These programs were made possible by the Nick Rudd Music Fund. Initiated by Rudd’s surviving wife Gina Manola and stepson Townes Durbin with a goal of the fund reaching endowment levels to ensure Nick Rudd Music Experience becomes established as an ongoing and permanent part of the music culture of our campus and community. To make a contribution towards the endowment, please contact David Allen at the School of Music.   These programs were also made possible with support from Humanities Research Institute, Improvisers Exchange, School of Music, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, and Spurlock Museum of World Cultures.

Performance: Joe Morris & Tomeka Reid Duo | Larry Ochs & Don Robinson Duo

Oct 06, 2021
7:30 pm
Levis Faculty Center

HRI is pleased to co-sponsor a series of programs on music improvisation featuring New England-based guitarist Joe Morris, widely recognized as one of the most original and important improvising artists of our time. Morris will offer a lecture and performance on Wednesday, October 6 and workshop on Friday, October 8, 2021. A duo performance at Humanities Research Institute with Chicago-based cellist Tomeka Reid will follow the lecture that evening in a special double bill with a San Francisco Bay Area duo featuring Larry Ochs (saxophone) & Don Robinson (drums). The two groups featured as part of the annual Nick Rudd Music Experience will offer listeners an opportunity to hear distinct directions in Free Music, along with a first-time collaboration among all four players, illustrating in performance aspects of Morris’ earlier lecture. Both groups are represented on recent releases, Morris / Reid’s “Combinations” on RogueArt (2020), and Ochs / Robinson’s second issue “A Civil Right” on ESP-Disk’ (2021).   ABOUT THE PERFORMERS Larry Ochs—Don Robinson Duo Celebrating the recent release of their second and definitive duo recording, A Civil Right, the San Francisco Bay Area’s Larry Ochs—Don Robinson Duo will perform pieces steeped in the spirit of free jazz and improvisation. Ochs is a founding member of the great Rova Saxophone Quartet, one of the Bay Area’s avant-garde treasures since 1978. Robinson— “a percussive dervish,” according to Coda Magazine – has worked with luminaries such as Cecil Taylor, Glenn Spearman, Lisle Ellis, Wadada Leo Smith, and was the drummer of choice for ROVA’s revivification of John Coltrane’s Ascension. From The Wire (Bill Meyer, 2021): “Even at its most restrained, the playing is forcefully muscular, with Ochs leveraging emotional impact from the grit in his tone on both tenor and sopranino, and Robinson operating with the economy of a long distance runner. “   Tomeka Reid Described as a “New Jazz Power Source” by the New York Times, cellist and composer Tomeka Reid has emerged as one of the most original, versatile, and curious musicians in Chicago’s bustling jazz and improvised music community over the last decade. Her distinctive melodic sensibility, always rooted in a strong sense of groove, has been featured in many distinguished ensembles over the years. Reid grew up outside of Washington D.C., but her musical career began after moving to Chicago in 2000. Her work with Nicole Mitchell and various Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians-related groups proved influential. By focusing on developing her craft in countless improvisational contexts, Reid has achieved a stunning musical fluency. She is a Foundation of the Arts (2019) and 3Arts Awardee (2016), and received her doctorate in music from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2017.   About Joe Morris Downbeat Magazine called guitarist/multi-instrumentalist/composer/improviser Joe Morris “the preeminent free music guitarist of his generation.” Will Montgomery, writing in WIRE magazine, called him “one of the most profound improvisers at work in the U.S.”   He was born in New Haven, Connecticut in 1955. He began playing guitar at the age of 14 first playing rock music, progressing to blues, then to jazz, free jazz and free improvisation. He released his first record Wraparound (riti) in 1983. He has composed over 200 original pieces of music.   Morris has performed and/or recorded with many of the most important contemporary artists in improvised music including, Anthony Braxton, Evan Parker, John Zorn, Ken Vandermark, Mary Halvorson, Tyshawn Sorey, Tomeka Reid, Fay Victor, Tim Berne, Jaimie Branch, William Parker, Sylvie Courvoisier, Agusti Fernandez, Peter Evans, David S. Ware, Joe Maneri, Dewey Redman, Sunny Murray, Wadada Leo Smith, Leroy Jenkins, Ikue Mori, Charmaine Lee, Lawrence D. “Butch” Morris, Marshall Allen, Barre Phillips, Barry Guy, Matthew Shipp, Sunny Murray, Zeena Parkins, Joe McPhee and many others.   These programs were made possible by the Nick Rudd Music Fund. Initiated by Rudd’s surviving wife Gina Manola and stepson Townes Durbin with a goal of the fund reaching endowment levels to ensure Nick Rudd Music Experience becomes established as an ongoing and permanent part of the music culture of our campus and community. To make a contribution towards the endowment, please contact David Allen at the School of Music.   These programs were also made possible with support from Humanities Research Institute, Improvisers Exchange, School of Music, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, and Spurlock Museum of World Cultures.

Remaining In Dialogue: Yossi Klein Halevi and Mohammad Darawshe on Israel, Palestine, and Bridging Deeply Held Divisions

Oct 07, 2021
4:30 pm to 6:00 pm
Illini Union, Rooms A & B

As many of us grapple with local and global conflicts and what the “new normal” can and should be, we are confronted with fundamental questions about shared community and core values. Now on campus following their virtual conversation with Chancellor Jones this past spring, Yossi Klein Halevi, New York Times bestselling author of Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor, and and Mohammad  Darawshe, a leading political analyst and advocate for Israel’s Arab sector, will delve more deeply into the impact of current conflicts and how we can remain in dialogue with one another through numerous challenges and crises. Attend in person or watch the livestream at go.illinois.edu/InDialogue .

GWS Black Feminist Theory Lecture Series: Tanya Saunders

Oct 08, 2021
12:00 pm

Dr. Tanya L. Saunders is an Associate Professor of Latin American Studies and Gender, Sexualities and Women's Studies at the University of Florida. Their 2015 book, Cuban Underground Hip Hop: Black Thoughts, Black Revolution, was published by the University of Texas Press and is recently translated into Portuguese. In 2021-2022, they will join the Hutchins Center for African American and African Research at Harvard University as a Spring 2022 Mark Claster Mamolen Fellow.

CEAPS Brown Bag - Roderick Wilson "Turbulent Streams: Producing Japan’s Modern River Regime"

Oct 08, 2021
3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

The rivers of Japan are both hydrologically and historically dynamic. Overshadowed in the popular imagination and academic studies by the seismic activity of earthquakes and volcanos, the country’s rivers exhibit a deep fluvial history of people’s interactions with these waters for fishing, irrigating rice paddies, providing drinking water as well as efforts to prevent flooding from ruining their livelihood. In this talk, I examine these fluvial processes over the long nineteenth century to argue that, while those rivers continue to flow to this day, the environmental relations that helped constitute them were fundamentally reengineered at the beginning of the twentieth century when a new and centralizing government along with wealthy rural landowners and flooding rivers produced the administrative and technological framework that is Japan’s modern river regime.   Roderick Wilson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History and the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He earned his PhD in East Asian history from Stanford University. Earlier this year, he published his first book, Turbulent Stream: An Environmental History of Japan’s Rivers, 1600–1930 (Brill, 2021), and is now working on his second book about the urban and environmental history of Tokyo. At the University of Illinois, he teaches a variety of courses on the history of Japan, East Asia, and global environmental history.

Improvisers Exchange Workshop with Joe Morris

Oct 08, 2021
3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Orchestra Rehearsal Room

HRI is pleased to co-sponsor a series of programs on music improvisation featuring New England-based guitarist Joe Morris, widely recognized as one of the most original and important improvising artists of our time. Morris will offer a lecture and performance on Wednesday, October 6.   The residency ends with Morris leading an Improvisers Exchange Workshop on the afternoon of Friday, October 8, where students, faculty, and community members are invited to participate.   About Joe Morris Downbeat Magazine called guitarist/multi-instrumentalist/composer/improviser Joe Morris “the preeminent free music guitarist of his generation.” Will Montgomery, writing in WIRE magazine, called him “one of the most profound improvisers at work in the U.S.”   He was born in New Haven, Connecticut in 1955. He began playing guitar at the age of 14 first playing rock music, progressing to blues, then to jazz, free jazz and free improvisation. He released his first record Wraparound (riti) in 1983. He has composed over 200 original pieces of music.   Morris has performed and/or recorded with many of the most important contemporary artists in improvised music including, Anthony Braxton, Evan Parker, John Zorn, Ken Vandermark, Mary Halvorson, Tyshawn Sorey, Tomeka Reid, Fay Victor, Tim Berne, Jaimie Branch, William Parker, Sylvie Courvoisier, Agusti Fernandez, Peter Evans, David S. Ware, Joe Maneri, Dewey Redman, Sunny Murray, Wadada Leo Smith, Leroy Jenkins, Ikue Mori, Charmaine Lee, Lawrence D. “Butch” Morris, Marshall Allen, Barre Phillips, Barry Guy, Matthew Shipp, Sunny Murray, Zeena Parkins, Joe McPhee and many others.   Morris is featured as leader, co-leader, or sideman on more than 180 commercially released recordings on the labels ECM, ESPdisk, Clean Feed, Hat Hut, Aum Fidelity, Avant, OkkaDisk, Not Two, Soul Note, Leo, No Business, Rogue Art, Relative Pitch, Incus, RareNoise, Fundacja Sluchaj, and his own labels Riti and Glacial Erratic. Morris has toured extensively throughout North America and Europe as well as in Brazil , Korea and Japan.   He has lectured and conducted workshops on his own music and on improvisation in the US, Canada, and Europe including at Princeton University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Bard College, University of Alberta, and University of Guelph. He was the recipient of the 2016 Killam Visiting Scholar Award at University of Calgary. He has been on the faculty at Tufts University, Southern Connecticut State University, Longy School of Music of Bard College, and New School. Since 2000, he has been on the faculty in the Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation Department at New England Conservatory. Morris is the author of the book Perpetual Frontier: The Properties of Free Music (Riti Publishing 2012).   These programs were made possible by the Nick Rudd Music Fund. Initiated by Rudd’s surviving wife Gina Manola and stepson Townes Durbin with a goal of the fund reaching endowment levels to ensure Nick Rudd Music Experience becomes established as an ongoing and permanent part of the music culture of our campus and community. To make a contribution towards the endowment, please contact David Allen at the School of Music.   These programs were also made possible with support from Humanities Research Institute, Improvisers Exchange, School of Music, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, and Spurlock Museum of World Cultures.

AsiaLENS: Jeronimo/Joseph Juhn (Virtual Screening + Online Filmmaker Discussion)

Oct 12, 2021
4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Virtual Screening: Friday, October 8, 2021, 5pm - Friday, October 15, 2021, 5pm (A link to view the film will be emailed to registered participants on October 8, 2021.) Online Filmmaker Discussion: Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 4pm ---About the Movie Born in 1926 to Korean indentured servant parents in Cuba, Jeronimo Lim becomes the first Korean to enroll in university in the same school and year as Fidel Castro. Jeronimo joins the Cuban revolution and later becomes a Vice Minister in the Castro government, crossing paths with Fidel and Che Guevara. However, after being disillusioned with the unfulfilled promises of communism, and after visiting his homeland, Korea, in 1995, Jeronimo becomes a changed man and dedicates the remaining years reconnecting to his Korean roots and singlehandedly rebuilding the Korean community in Cuba. (Joseph Juhn. 2019. Cuba / South Korea / United States. 93 minutes.) --- About the Director Joseph is an award-winning lawyer-turned-filmmaker with a passion for diasporic narrative. His first feature documentary, "JERONIMO", which is about a Korean Cuban revolutionary, drew over 20,000 audiences when it opened in theaters in Korea. Moreover, the film was selected at 17 film festivals around the world, winning several awards on the way. Prior to working on “JERONIMO” full-time, Joseph was an in-house counsel at the Manhattan-based South Korean government agency (KOTRA) for 4 years where he advised Korean companies and entrepreneurs on US intellectual property and startup law. Here, his job revolved primarily around soft IP law, assisting companies draft business strategies around their IP assets while implementing mechanisms to avoid potential IP disputes with US counterparts. Passionate about causes pertinent to the Korean American community, Joseph also served on the steering committee of KSE (Korean Startups & Entrepreneurs), a non-profit with an aim to empower entrepreneurs of Korean descent in the US. *This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies and the Spurlock Museum of World Cultures. *This event is supported by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center (NRC) program.

DH @ Illinois 2nd Thursday Happy Hour

Oct 14, 2021
5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Rose Bowl Tavern (106 N Race St Ste 1, Urbana, IL 61801)

Join the University Library and the HathiTrust Research Center for a socially-distanced happy hour at the Rose Bowl Tavern. Chill on the patio with Digital Humanities folks from across the campus to build community over frosty beverages. All faculty, staff, and students are welcome.

Medieval Studies Alumni Lecture Series: Karen Lurkhur

Oct 14, 2021
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm

Medieval Icelandic Bodies in Tristram ok Ísodd   In the Old French and Middle High German Tristan romances, the hero suffers from a number of physical traumas that symbolize his emotional suffering. In the Old Icelandic version of this work, the Saga af Tristram ok Ísodd, however, the hero’s injuries are both more lurid and suggestive, but the saga treats them more as spectacle than as symbol. This attitude towards the hero’s wounds is shaped by the use of the grotesque in the construction of male bodies in the Old Icelandic family sagas.

Symptoms Of Crisis: “Revolution as History’s Emergency Brake!”

Oct 14, 2021
7:30 pm
Levis Faculty Center, Room 108

ABOUT THE SPEAKER Behrooz Ghamari-Tabrizi is Professor and Chair of Near Eastern Studies Department and Director of Sharmin and Bijan Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Iran and Persian Gulf Studies at Princeton University. He is the author of Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment, Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2016; and Remembering Akbar: Inside the Iranian Revolution, New York, London: O/R Books (Counterpoint), 2016. He works on topics related to social theory and Islamist political thought and is currently working on a project on Mystical Modernity, a comparative study of philosophy of history and political theory of Walter Benjamin and Ali Shariati.

Research Cluster Event: Transformative Learning through Zine Making

Oct 15, 2021
12:00 am

Join us for the “Transformative Learning through Zine Making” research cluster’s capstone event where you’ll hear from students, librarians, faculty, and staff about how zines and comics have enhanced their scholarship and teaching practices. Featured speakers include Eman Zwawi, Illinois undergraduate student; Dawn Bohn, Associate Professor, Food Science & Human Nutrition; Maria Emerson, Student Success Librarian, University Library; Aesthetics of Research, Columbia College Chicago; and MK Czerwiec, Graphic Medicine. Keynote by Jenna Freedman, Barnard College Library. Check back for more details soon!

CEAPS Speaker - Cindi SturtzSreetharan "Enacting and Experiencing Fat Stigma: Stories from Japan"

Oct 15, 2021
3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Understanding language as social action draws attention to the ways in which fat stigmatizing discourses do social harm. Drawing on interviews and experiences from women and men in Osaka, Japan, I look closely at how fat stigma is expressed in Japanese, both blatantly and through more subtle language use. I focus on four key themes in people’s narratives around localized ideas about fatness.

DH @ Illinois Virtual Open Office Hours

Oct 21, 2021
11:00 am to 12:00 pm
https://illinois.zoom.us/j/85660603675?pwd=cHhtOHJDTWhMeThlOGVoUVorUThFdz09&from=addon

Join Spencer Keralis (DH Librarian) and Glen Worthey (Associate Director for Research Support Services, HathiTrust Research Center) for an Open Office Hours to chat about DH projects and resources at Illinois. All are welcome! Drop in for as little or as much time as you’d like. Join with this Zoom link.

Legal Humanities Lecture: Franita Tolson

Oct 28, 2021
7:30 pm

Franita Tolson (Vice Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs and Professor of Law in the Gould School of Law, University of Southern California) will present on her forthcoming book In Congress We Trust?: Enforcing Voting Rights from the Founding to the Jim Crow Era, followed by responses from Marsha Barrett (History) and Michael Morley (Law, Florida State University).

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