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Upcoming Events

Contemporary Conversations: The Role of University Museums

Apr 04, 2019
5:30 pm to 7:00 pm
Spurlock Museum, 600 S Gregory St, Urbana

Join campus museum leaders in an informal conversation as they examine current museum topics and trends, and discuss the role of the university museum on campus and in the community.

Genealogies of Black Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century

Apr 05, 2019
9:30 am to 5:00 pm
Wohlers 166

How does modernity look when read through black diasporic literary production in the long nineteenth century? What new narratives can we create by reading this literature as participating in and producing transatlantic genealogies of literary modernity? How does reading black literary modernity in the nineteenth century disrupt our understandings of modernity as a conceptual framework? Speakers examine black reading and writing practices, visual culture, intellectual history, and modernity broadly conceived through abolitionist iconography, transatlantic iterations of the Anglo-African, reprinting, and black tastemakers. The symposium features a plenary lecture by Carla Peterson, Professor of English (Emerita), University of Maryland, College Park.

Penny Muse Abernathy (UNC-Chapel Hill) | "Can You Trust Your Local News?"

Apr 06, 2019
12:30 pm
300 Levis Faculty Center

Presented by Professor Penny Muse Abernathy, Knight Chair in Journalism and Digital Media Economics at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Over the past decade and a half, the U.S. has lost 1,800 newspapers and half of its newspaper journalists, giving rise to news deserts across vast swaths of the country. Abernathy will explore the implications for our society and the collaborative effort that will be needed if we are to reverse the trend. Presented by the Fake News, Post-Truth, and News Literacy research cluster. Supported by the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. Additional support from the Department of Journalism and School of Information Sciences.

Donald E. Pease (Dartmouth College) | "Indigeneity, 'Americanity', Nathaniel Hawthorne's Romance with Settler Colonial Capitalism"

Apr 09, 2019
4:00 pm
Illini Union 210

This Distinguished Speaker Lecture offers a revisionist understanding of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter by discerning the disavowal of settler colonial “economies of dispossession” as the precondition for “American Renaissance” interpretations of the romance’s characters, themes, narrative, plot, and scene of writing. By placing the narrative's settler colonial strain of racial capitalism into conversation with Indigenous critical studies theorists, Black studies scholars, and critical ethnic studies scholars, Prof. Pease also intends to show how contemporary modes of predatory accumulation re-animate pre-national governance apparatuses of colonization, settlement, and racialization.

Nicole Krauss Lecture

Apr 09, 2019
5:00 pm
Spurlock Museum, Knight Auditorium (600 S Gregory St, Urbana)

This event is part of the 21st Century Jewish Writing and the World writers series. Nicole Krauss is the author of the New York Times bestsellers, Great House, a finalist for the National Book Award and Orange Prize, and The History of Love, which won the Saroyan Prize for International Literature and France’s Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger, and was short-listed for the Orange, Medicis, and Femina Prizes. Her first novel, Man Walks Into a Room, was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award.

Samuel K. Roberts | “Radical Recovery: Making Urban Political Subjects and Drug Policy in the Era of Criminalization”

Apr 11, 2019
4:00 pm
IPRH Lecture Hall, Levis Faculty Center, Fourth Floor (919 West Illinois Street, Urbana) 

In this talk, Dr. Roberts discusses local political protest movements for addiction treatment in the 1960s and 1970s. Radical Recovery movements framed the social problem of drug use within a (geo)political and economic critique of capital and therefore presented an early challenge to the biomedicalization of addiction. Unfortunately, in their privileging of abstinence, these movements also set the stage for popular ethnic-based resistance to harm reduction policies such as specific uses of methadone and syringe exchange.Samuel K. Roberts is Associate Professor of History (School of Arts & Sciences) and Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences (Mailman School of Public Health) at Columbia University, and is a former Director of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS). He writes, teaches, and lectures widely on African-American history, medical and public health history, urban history, issues of policing and criminal justice, and the history of social movements. He is the author of Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation (University of North Carolina Press, 2009). Dr. Roberts received his M.A. and Ph.D. in History at Princeton University.

Fashion, Style, & Aesthetics Reading Group Guest Lecture

Apr 12, 2019
2:00 pm
Levis Center, Room 208

The Fashion, Style, & Aesthetics Reading Group welcomes Lauren Downing Peters on April 12 at 2PM at Levis Center, Room 208.  Lauren Downing Peters is an Assistant Professor of Fashion Studies at Columbia College Chicago. She was a student in the first cohort of Fashion Studies MA Program at the Parsons School of Design and received her Ph.D. from the Centre for Fashion Studies at Stockholm University in 2018.  She will present on her research on the topic of the history and politics of plus-size fashion.  FSA's goal is to amplify the fashion discourse at the University of Illinois.

Family Walk and Talk

Apr 13, 2019
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Krannert Art Museum, 500 E Peabody Dr.

Join us for a fun afternoon at Krannert Art Museum. This event makes it easy to explore the museum as a family. Each family can pick up art cards, follow the path at your own pace, and be amazed! This event is geared specially toward caregivers and children ages 6-10. This event is free (donations accepted) and open to the public. Please visit http://kam.illinois.edu for more information.

Public Opening Reception: School of Art + Design Master of Fine Arts Exhibition

Apr 13, 2019
5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
KAM Main Level

You are welcome to the opening reception of a temporary exhibition featuring work from artists in the Master program at the School of Art + Design. The gallery will be open until 7pm on the Saturday, after which the gallery will be open during normal museum hours. This event is free (donations accepted) and open to the public. Please visit http://kam.illinois.edu for more information.

The Odyssey Project Student Presentations

Apr 15, 2019
5:30 pm
Second Floor, Levis Faculty Center (919 W. Illinois Street, Urbana)

Part of Undergraduate Research Week

Dark Participation: Theoretical Considerations, Empirical Findings

Apr 18, 2019
3:30 pm to 4:50 pm
317 Gregory Hall

Participation in online media has seemingly lost its innocence: What once started as a hopeful promise for media and society in the 1990s, developed into the object of public fears and concerns among media and tech companies. Trolling, bullying and strategic manipulation seem to be very common in comment sections and social media these days. Dr. Thorsten Quandt, professor of communication studies at the University of Münster, will present some prominent examples of dark participation, discuss the analytic concept, and present some recent empirical studies, including interview studies with community managers, representative surveys of users, and large-scale automated content analyses.

Environmental Humanities: Undergraduate Research Symposium

Apr 19, 2019
1:00 pm to 3:30 pm
IPRH Lecture Hall, Levis Faculty Center, Fourth Floor (919 West Illinois Street, Urbana)

Are you interested in how the sciences, arts, and humanities intersect to address environmental issues? The IPRH-Mellon Environmental Humanities Undergraduate Research Group is a collective of students exploring how matters of the environment can be understood through a humanistic lens. As we do so, we seek to dive into the untold narratives of physical and social environments. Join us in breaking the boundaries of your academic discipline and engaging with student researchers in other fields! This event is free and open to all undergraduates, graduates, faculty, and community members. Part of Undergraduate Research Week. Supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Hell Holes Or Saviors: Transnational Visions of Southeast Asian Trans Surgery

Apr 23, 2019
4:00 pm
GWS House, 1205 W. Nevada St.

This talk investigates political economies of risk logic by looking at how transnational trans and queer studies comprehend trans people’s patronage of “back alley surgeons.” Aizura compares online reviews of and videos about Pratunam Polyclinic, a walk-in aesthetic surgery clinic in Bangkok, Thailand with a large trans clientele, which some consider a “hellhole” but which others describe as a renowned center for transgender surgeries. This comparison troubles the exceptionalist logic that global north nations offer the best surgical care and yield the most satisfied trans surgery candidates. Arguing that the spectral other of the “high quality” or “caring” surgical procedure is a subject thought to be condemned to mutilation, disfigurement, and unimaginable pain and suffering, Aizura shows how this spectralizes and marginalizes low-income trans people (particularly trans and gender nonconforming people outside the global north) who access low-cost surgical procedures as naturally risky or insensitive to “bad” care. Aren Aizura is an assistant professor in Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies at the University of Minnesota and the author of Mobile Subjects: transnational imaginaries of gender reassignment (Duke UP, 2018). He is the co-editor of the Transgender Studies Reader 2 (Routledge 2013) and his work has appeared in numerous journals and books, including Queer Necropolitics (Routledge, 2014) and Trans Studies: Beyond Homo/Hetero Normativities (Rutgers University Press, 2015). He is currently working on a new project on mobility, space, and transgender representation in film. This event is paid for by the Student Cultural Programming Fee, and co-sponsored by Anthropology, Asian American Studies, the LGBT Resource Center, and the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities.

Inside Scoop with Poet Claudia Rankine

Apr 24, 2019
12:00 pm
Bruce D. Nesbitt African American Cultural Center

Intended for students from across the campus, Inside Scoop conversations invite Illinois undergraduates to engage with the exciting work conducted by scholars whose work helps us understand what it means to be human in a world of rapidly shifting global complexities. These sessions offer an opportunity for all interested undergrads, no matter their majors, to engage with creative minds in the humanities. Lunch will be served. Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric and Don't Let Me Be Lonely; two plays including The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/American Repertory Theatre) and will be published with Graywolf Press in 2019, and Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; as well as numerous video collaborations. She is also the editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. In 2016, she co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII). Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Poets and Writers' Jackson Poetry Prize, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, United States Artists, and the National Endowment of the Arts. She is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and teaches at Yale University as the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut.Co-sponsored by the Department of African American Studies and the Bruce D. Nesbitt African American Cultural Center.

KAM Event | Artist Talk with Louise Fishman

Apr 24, 2019
5:15 pm
KAM Lower Level, Auditorium

Come hear this special artist talk, a Distinguished Alumni Lecture featuring Louise Fishman, painter. A reception following immediately afterward. This event is free (donations accepted) and open to the public. Please visit http://kam.illinois.edu for more information.

Reading by Claudia Rankine

Apr 24, 2019
7:30 pm
Alice Campbell Alumni Center (601 S Lincoln Ave, Urbana)

Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry, including Citizen: An American Lyric and Don't Let Me Be Lonely; two plays including The White Card, which premiered in February 2018 (ArtsEmerson/American Repertory Theatre) and will be published with Graywolf Press in 2019, and Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; as well as numerous video collaborations. She is also the editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. In 2016, she co-founded The Racial Imaginary Institute (TRII). Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the Poets and Writers' Jackson Poetry Prize, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, United States Artists, and the National Endowment of the Arts. She is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and teaches at Yale University as the Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut. A book signing will follow the reading.Co-sponsored by the Department of African American Studies.

Sociolinguistics Symposium 2019: Acts of Identity

Apr 25, 2019
12:00 am
Illini Union, Fourth Floor

This symposium is held in conjunction with the 11th Annual Meeting of the Illinois Language and Linguistics Society (ILLS11). This pre-conference symposium invites abstracts that focus of various semiotic practices.--including but not limited to codeswitching, stance-taking, lexical choice, script choice, and phonetic variation—of identity-construction/meaning making in different modalities (spoken, written, visual). Plenary Speakers: Erica Britt (University of Michigan-Flint), "Oral History and the Discursive Construction of Identity in Urban Spaces." Krystals Smalls (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign), "Identity Politics 2.0: Racial Nationalism and the Semiotics of Epistemic Resistance in Digital Discourse." Sharese King (University of Chicago), "Constructing African American Models of Personhood." For more information and to register please see the Symposium website: Sociolinguistics Symposium 2019.  

What’s the Community Got to Do with It? African American Community-Empowerment in Research and Intervention

Apr 25, 2019
7:00 pm
Knight Auditorium, Spurlock Museum (600 South Gregory, Urbana)

Empirical data indicates significant health disparities among African Americans, including increased risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, asthma, and HIV. These unequal health outcomes are attributed in part to racial disparities in the health care system. Additionally, racial stress African Americans experience in daily life is linked to increased psychological distress, including depression and anxiety. Internationally recognized scholar Cheryl Grills will discuss the applied community research she has conducted over the past three decades to decrease health disparities among African Americans. She will present community intervention efforts that have been proven to reduce distress and promote well-being in the face of racial stress, with a focus on the development, implementation, and evaluation of Emotional Emancipation Circles. Hosted by: Community Healing and Resistance Through Storytelling (C-HeARTS) In conjunction with: Counseling Center, Counseling Psychology Program, Department of Human Development & Family Studies, Department of Kinesiology & Community Health, Department of Psychology, Department of Sociology, DREAAM House, First Presbyterian Church, Spurlock Museum MillerComm Lecture Series 2019 

Yoga at the Museum

Apr 26, 2019
11:30 am to 12:30 pm
KAM Lower Level, Hood Classroom

A Friday lunchtime series of free yoga classes introduces participants to the fundamentals of hatha yoga at Krannert Art Museum. Please bring a mat and wear comfortable clothing. This event is free (donations accepted) and open to the public. Please visit http://kam.illinois.edu for more information.

IPRH Prizes for Research Ceremony and Reception

May 02, 2019
4:00 pm
IPRH Lecture Hall, Levis Faculty Center, Fourth Floor (919 West Illinois Street, Urbana)

KAM Luncheon and Lecture

May 03, 2019
12:00 pm
Champaign Country Club 1211 S Prospect Ave, Champaign, IL 61820

This Spring Luncheon and Lecture invites you to hear from Kevin Hamilton, Dean, College of Fine and Applied Arts. The public is invited, and reservations are required. Please contact Chris Schaede (217 244 0516 or kam@illinois.edu) for reservation information.


Public Opening Reception: School of Art + Design Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition

May 04, 2019
5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
KAM Main Level

You are welcome to the opening reception of a temporary exhibition featuring work from artists in the Bachelor program at the School of Art + Design. The gallery will be open until 7pm on the Saturday, after which the gallery will be open during normal museum hours. This event is free (donations accepted) and open to the public. Please visit http://kam.illinois.edu for more information.

From Dissertation to Book

May 14, 2019
3:00 pm
Coble Hall 304

Every graduate student hears many times “the dissertation is not the book,” but what does that really mean? Dawn Durante, a senior acquisitions editor at the University of Illinois Press, will discuss the differences between the dissertation and the book and give helpful advice on how to approach revisions in order to transform a successful dissertation into a successful book manuscript.

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